History

History is now fully integrated into our thematic curriculum with many units of study following a historical line of enquiry based on the areas of learning that are within the new National Curriculum 2014 document.

History contributes to curriculum by stimulating pupils’ curiosity and imagination about the way of life of people living in the past in Britain and other parts of the world. It develops their critical thinking and equips them to begin to be able to sift evidence and see the world from different viewpoints. A knowledge, and understanding of the past helps the children to tackle the issues of today.

In the Foundation Stage, History is part of the area “Understanding the World”, the children learn about History through finding out about their own history. 

In Key Stage 1 the teaching of History is topic based, fitting around and underpinning the topics investigated in this Key Stage. We aim to enable the children to develop an awareness of the past and the ways in which it is similar to and different from the present and to be able to use simple vocabulary relating to the passing of time such as ‘before’, ‘after’, ‘past’, ‘present’, ‘then’ and ‘now’. We also try to help the children to understand the concept of our country’s history and its place in the world.

In Key Stage 2 we aim:

  • To provide children with the opportunity to learn about some periods of British History and that of other countries and cultures.
  • To provide children with the experience of using different historical sources. 
  • To present the past both in teaching , learning and enrichment experiences that children can relate to.
  • To develop children’s ability to explain and analyse the historical periods studied and understand different points of view.

Children study areas of history as diverse as the legacy of Ancient Greece to the experience of Polar explorers such as Scott and Amundsen. History work is closely linked to other areas of the curriculum to make History meaningful and relevant to the children.  History lessons are usually introduced to the whole class and developed through group and individual work allowing for differentiation. Children are encouraged to develop their own lines of enquiry where applicable. 

HISTORY

History milestones are split into 4 areas

  • To investigate and interpret the past
  • To build an overview of world history
  • To understand chronology
  • To communicate historically

The table below shows you the national expectations in each of these areas at the end of Year 2, Year 4 and Year 6.

 

Milestone 1

Milestone 2

Milestone 3

To investigate and interpret the past

• Observe or handle evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.

• Ask questions such as: What was it like for people? What happened? How long ago?

• Use artefacts, pictures, stories, online sources and databases to find out about the past.

• Identify some of the different ways the past has been represented.

• Use evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.

• Suggest suitable sources of evidence for historical enquiries.

• Use more than one source of evidence for historical enquiry in order to gain a more accurate understanding of history.

• Describe different accounts of a historical event, explaining some of the reasons why the accounts may differ.

• Suggest causes and consequences of some of the main events and changes in history.

• Use sources of evidence to deduce information about the past.

• Select suitable sources of evidence, giving reasons for choices.

• Use sources of information to form testable hypotheses about the past.

• Seek out and analyse a wide range of evidence in order to justify claims about the past.

• Show an awareness of the concept of propaganda and how historians must understand the social context of evidence studied.

• Understand that no single source of evidence gives the full answer to questions about the past.

• Refine lines of enquiry as appropriate.

To build an overview of world history

• Describe historical events.

• Describe significant people from the past.

• Recognise that there are reasons why people in the past acted as they did.

• Describe changes that have happened in the locality of the school throughout history.

• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from ancient until medieval times.

• Compare some of the times studied with those of other areas of interest around the world.

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

• Identify continuity and change in the history of the locality of the school.

• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from medieval until the Tudor and Stuarts times.

• Compare some of the times studied with those of the other areas of interest around the world. 

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.

To understand chronology

• Place events and artefacts in order on a time line.

• Label time lines with words or phrases such as: past, present, older and newer.

• Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives.

• Use dates where appropriate.

• Place events, artefacts and historical figures on a time line using dates.

• Understand the concept of change over time, representing this, along with evidence, on a time line.

• Use dates and terms to describe events.

• Describe the main changes in a period of history (using terms such as: social, religious, political, technological and cultural).

• Identify periods of rapid change in history and contrast them with times of relatively little change.

• Understand the concepts of continuity and change over time, representing them, along with evidence, on a time line.

• Use dates and terms accurately in describing events.

To communicate historically

• Use words and phrases such as: a long time ago, recently, when my parents/carers were children, years, decades and centuries to describe the passing of time.

• Show an understanding of the concept of nation and a nation’s history.

• Show an understanding of concepts such as civilisation, monarchy, parliament, democracy, and war and peace.

• Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 

    • dates 

    • time period 

    • era 

    • change 

    • chronology.

• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to a good standard in order to communicate information about the past.

• Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 

    • dates 

    • time period 

    • era 

    • chronology 

    • continuity 

    • change 

    • century 

    • decade 

    • legacy.

• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to a exceptional standard in order to communicate information about the past.

• Use original ways to present information and ideas.